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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So my primary interest in this car is the 2.0l turbo engine that will be made available. I hear it's similar or shares heritage with the Dodge SRT-4 and Mitsubishi Evo engines, both excellent engines for the tuner crowds. I personally own an SRT-4, and I can attest to how bullet proof the engine is. I was encouraged to see that features like oil jets (spraying on the underside of the pistons) are incorporated in the Theta engine. It will just help to keep it a reliable tuner's engine.

There are numerous SRT-4 engines producing numbers close to the 500HP mark reliably without too much modification on the engine itself. I wonder what the stock BK Theta engine will be able to handle in terms of turning up the boost levels. I read in the Motor Trend article that Hyundai engineers have pushed the engine to 29psi before failures. But I wonder what failed exactly.

Anyhow I seems like this will become a cool car to own and modify.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Here's something interesting I found in the technical specs. The MAP sensors have a range of 0-240kPa, which means it is 2.4 bar MAP sensors. This would mean they could read boost levels up to approximately 20.1 PSI before needing to be replaced for higher performance levels. Now the question is, can/will the ECU compensate for an increase in pressure beyond normal specified boost levels, either by introducing a boost controller or reprogramming the ECU (if that'll be an option).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Dynochart of Theta engine and engine shots

Here are some shots of the engine and dynochart.

Angle shot:


Front shot:


Top shot:


Isometric shot:


Shot of the oil jets I was talking about in the OP:


Dyno chart (may only be demonstrative of turbo effects on engines, not sure):


Dyno chart:


Turbo assembly:


This is a chart that shows how much boost is read during full throttle. Assuming they were using the 2.4 bar MAP sensor it looks like it was reading 2.5-3.0V (depending on which MAP sensor you're looking at). Assuming a linear reading then this would mean they were boosting around 6.18 psi. Can anyone confirm this? I know they don't have a boost gauge on the dash, but maybe someone has read something about this I'm thinking.


Enjoy the pics!

Civictd04
 

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Good info.

My thoughts:

Boost:
6-7 PSI would correspond to the lower HP and Torque numbers compared to the other World engines being used in the EVO and SRT-4. Those engines are pushing much higher psi. I think the EVO is around 19psi and makes 290HP. The SRT-4 with bigger displacement is pushing around 16 psi I believe. So what does this mean?? Not a whole lot. Both the EVO and SRT-4 while using the same World Engine platform design but that does not mean they have to use the internal configurations. That's obvious as the EVO and Genesis Coupe are running smaller displacement versus the SRT-4.

Which leads me to one thing that I don't quite understand. Why only 2.0l instead of 2.4l like in the SRT-4? With the curb weight of the car I would think that you would want as much low end torque as possible. I know how hard it is to move a heavy car with a 4 cyl as I used to own a turbocharged Ford Turbocoupe Thunderbird that had a similar curb weight. It was a pain in stop and go traffic and especially on hills. Maybe the 6 sp manual will help in this regard and be geared to overcome the weight.

Turbocharger:
Something that I was VERY pleased to see was that the turbo exhaust manifold and turbo itself were NOT one unit like on the SRT-4. This will make turbo upgrades much easier and hopefully cheaper than having to replace everything as one unit.

More of my thoughts later!




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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Yeah I agree, why not a 2.4 liter? I think basically they didn't want to make as much or more power than the v6 engine, which makes sense from a marketing perspective, but makes no sense from a performance/demographics perspective, since it appears the four cylinder will be the engine of choice for many tuners. Then again, maybe we'll see a bunch of twin turbocharged v6 Genesis coupes driving around!

I also am glad that the manifold is not a one piece design like the SRT-4. Allows for easier upgrade path, and like you said, cheaper to boot. I was disappointed that there was no information on what type of turbo (the manufacturer of the turbo that is) used in the Theta TCI engine, other than it uses special metals and has a 3D type wheel. Knowing the flow characteristics of the turbo by knowing which turbo it is would help to know what are the theoretical limits of the stock turbo (how much can you boost and at what RPMs to make maximum power). Knowing from experience that the SRT-4 uses a ridiculously small turbo for the engine size, yet people are still able to squeeze out over 300HP on the stock turbo... it seems that this turbo appears in the pictures to be a bigger turbo, which may be able to produce similar numbers before upgrades to the turbo are needed. At this point I think the transmission is of greater concern to me. See my post in the transmission performance section for what I mean.

I wonder if the ECU will be easily progammable by the aftermarket like the Evo, or will it be a pain up until recently like the SRT-4. Not that you can't get around such things, but it definitely is easier to make more power if the ECU can be reprogrammed.

One correction to your post though, most stock SRT-4 boost between 11-15psi. Depends on the climate and such. But that confuses me, how could Hyundai come out with a 2.0l boosting much less and make almost the same HP as the Dodge? Maybe the CVVT makes up for some of that, maybe better efficiency, maybe Dodge is underrating power (they are).

Civictd04
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Oh, one more thing that I think sucks, and maybe it's not too late for Hyundai to fix/change this. I noticed in the technical docs that the intercooler uses plastic end tanks for the intercooler to save on weight. Is it really worth it? From what I've heard, plastic end tanks on intercoolers is not a good thing, at least not in the past, maybe technology has advanced, but I took a double-take on the document after reading that. I think my first upgrade to the car woud be an all alluminum BFMIC. Just my thoughts anyway, maybe Hyundai is counting on that as well. I predict there could be a flurry of OEM Hyundai Genesis Coupe intercoolers for sale on Ebay.
 

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Oh, one more thing that I think sucks, and maybe it's not too late for Hyundai to fix/change this. I noticed in the technical docs that the intercooler uses plastic end tanks for the intercooler to save on weight. Is it really worth it? From what I've heard, plastic end tanks on intercoolers is not a good thing, at least not in the past, maybe technology has advanced, but I took a double-take on the document after reading that. I think my first upgrade to the car woud be an all alluminum BFMIC. Just my thoughts anyway, maybe Hyundai is counting on that as well. I predict there could be a flurry of OEM Hyundai Genesis Coupe intercoolers for sale on Ebay.
Ya that does suck.. It's not uncommon tho, radiators are often made this way. BFMIC will be a good mod especially after turning up the boost. Also a thing i noticed, the O2 sensor housing looks really restrictive. That will be another mod that will be done.



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