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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Nice write-up by Motortrend on the 3.8 Track. They were able to review both the AT and MT. Some notable quotes:

"Better than an M3? In this instance, it appears so."
"Build quality seems first rate."

Full article is here:
2010 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track - First Test of the Hyundai Genesis Coupe - Motor Trend
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First Test: 2010 Hyundai Genesis Coupe 3.8 Track
Ssssssssliderule: Calculating Performance Numbers for the Hyundai Genesis Coupe was Easy. Figuring Out Where it Fits Into The Sports-Car Equation is Another Story.
By Ron Kiino
Photography by Wesley Allison



Just a year ago, Hyundai pulled out the red carpet to launch the Genesis, a rear-drive, V-8-motivated luxury car with power and grace akin to that of a Lexus LS 460. Its pricetag, however, resembled the one dangling from the rearview of a Chrysler 300C. And wouldn't you know it, just as the original Lexus LS did 20 years ago, the Genesis garnered much attention, plenty of love, and due respect.

It certainly got ours. In fact, had it not been for the extraordinary Nissan GT-R, the Genesis would be reveling in Motor Trend Car of the Year glory for the next seven months. Suffice it to say, the Genesis is one of several top-notch products coming from the now formidable Korean brand.

Don't believe us? Well, Hyundai was one of only four automakers to sell more vehicles in January 2009 than it did in January 2008. In other words, in a month when such terms as "Great Recession" were floating around and Chrysler's sales were down 54.8 percent, GM's 48.9, and Toyota's 31.7, Hyundai's were on the rise. Baby steps? Hyundai is making giant strides.

One such stride -- and it's a big one, especially considering Hyundai's sportiest vehicle to date was the 172-horsepower front-drive Tiburon -- is the all-new 2010 Genesis Coupe. Just as the Genesis sedan's mission was to boldly lead Hyundai into the luxury-car arena, the Coupe's is to unabashedly storm the sports-car field. What's the formula? Try 300-plus-horsepower, rear drive, and styling that'll startle a Town Car. But does it work? Let's explore.

HEART AND SEOUL

Similar to Nissan's VQ-series V-6, which powers everything from the Altima and 370Z to the Infiniti FX35 and G37, Hyundai's Lambda V-6 is an engine that gets around. In transverse configuration, it powers, among others, the Hyundai Azera and Veracruz, and the Kia Amanti and Sedona. Shift the configuration 90 degrees, though, and the 3.8-liter Lambda is ready for rear-drive duty, as in the Genesis sedan and the Kia Borrego SUV. Now it trickles its way into the Genesis Coupe, in which it represents the topline power plant. (A 2.0-liter turbocharged four gets the call for entry-level assignment.) Accordingly, the 3.8 is tuned to 306 horsepower and 266 pound-feet of torque, and features all-aluminum construction, dual overhead camshafts, and continuously variable valve timing on both intake and exhaust. Perhaps most pleasing is the fact that the 3.8 consumes good old-fashioned 87 octane. Every other rear-drive import in its class, including the 370Z, Mazda RX-8, and BMW 135i, guzzles costlier 91 octane. Plus, the 3.8's estimated fuel economy of 17 city/26 highway is better than that of the 3.0-liter twin-turbo BMW (17/25) and the 1.3-liter rotary Mazda (16/22).

Transmission choices for the Genesis Coupe, which is built alongside the sedan at Hyundai's Ulsan, Korea, assembly plant, include a Hyundai-sourced six-speed manual and a ZF six-speed automatic. The manual utilizes a sporty 3.54 axle ratio while the auto, also used in V-8 Genesis sedans, gets an even more dynamic 3.73 as well as steering-wheel-mounted paddle shifters. Saddled with curb weights within just four pounds of each other (the 3478-pound manual vehicle, surprisingly, weighed more than the auto car), the two 3.8 Track models each hoofed from 0 to 60 in 5.5 seconds, with the negligibly lighter and more aggressively geared auto car clipping the quarter mile two-tenths sooner, at 14.0 at 101.0 mph.

This is a quick coupe, for sure -- a Jag XK needs 5.8 seconds to reach 60 and to 14.3 at 98.3 to nab the quarter -- but not as brisk as several others in its class. The 370Z, 135i, and Mustang GT all put up better numbers. Maybe the onus falls on the engine. The so-called "RS 3800" V-6 (for Rear-drive Sport), which does emit a pleasing growl as it revs effortlessly to the 6500-rpm redline, is no-doubt a refined engine -- arguably more refined than Nissan's VQ -- but it doesn't seem 306 horsepower strong. "I realize that on paper this is a 300-plus-horsepower car," says associate editor Allyson Harwood, "but it doesn't feel like it. It was pretty quick off the line, but I guess I expected a little more thrust."

The six-speed manual also was a bit of a letdown. Its rubbery feel generally led to imprecise experiences, especially when attempting to shift quickly, and its placement on the center console seemed an inch or so too rearward. An RX-8's gearbox will make you jealous. And as editor-at-large Arthur St. Antoine notes, our manual test car suffered from "Lots of driveline lash, making it very difficult to execute smooth shifts and throttle inputs." The manual, alas, left us feeling that the proven ZF slushbox is the transmission of choice, certainly in light of the standard paddle shifters and generally quicker acceleration times.

BETTER THAN AN E46 M3

The last-generation BMW M3 was, and still is, a fantastic GT car. No person in his right mind could say its structure felt like soggy fettuccine. Well, according to Hyundai, the Genesis Coupe boasts a body 24 percent stiffer in bending rigidity than that of the E46 Bimmer. Better than an M3? In this instance, it appears so.

We all agreed the Genesis Coupe feels sapphire solid. Build quality seems first rate. The doors shut with a reassuring thump. Whether navigating a straight highway or a winding byway, the Hyundai comes across tight and well put together. This overall feel of solidity, of course, is a welcome plus, as it not only gave Hyundai engineers a strong starting point, but it also provides the driver with quicker and more communicative responses. Within these realms, the robust Genesis Coupe mostly succeeds. The front strut and rear multilink suspension can be best described as modestly stiff, thanks in part to our Track model's sport-tuned gear, which flaunts firmer springs, larger front and rear anti-roll bars, and 19-inch alloys with summer Bridgestones. The ride is never jarring, but it does act unrefined at times, occasionally crashing onto its bump stops and relaying a wee too much road granularity.

Present the Genesis Coupe with a curvy road, though, and the tautness of the track-tuned chassis pays dividends. The steering, with its relatively rapid 14.7:1 ratio, offers crisp turn-in and solid linearity, but disappoints with a somewhat gluey feel. When the pace quickens, the Hyundai displays modest roll and understeer, but its instinct to stay flat inspires confidence when exploring the limits. Speaking of limits, the Genesis Coupe's standard stability and traction control can be turned completely off. But unless you're impersonating drift champ Rhys Millen, it's probably best to leave that button untouched, as the Track's Torsen LSD can't cheat the laws of physics.

In our instrumented handling tests, the 3.8 Track cars recorded lateral acceleration of 0.90 g (manual) and 0.91 g (auto), and figure-eight runs of 26.2 seconds at 0.67 g and 26.3 at 0.68. Again, these figures outgun those of the upper-echelon Jag XK (0.89, 26.8 at 0.66), but not of its two main rivals, the Mustang GT and 370Z. Ditto for 60-to-0 braking, which, at 111 feet, is just shy of the spans from the Ford (108) and the Nissan (109). As usual, credit goes to the Track model's unfaltering Brembo braking system, which uses meaty monobloc fixed calipers and substantial 13.4-inch front/13.0-inch rear vented rotors.

CHECKING THE BOXES

While the Genesis Coupe doesn't head its competitive field in driving dynamics, it is far and away the value leader. A base 3.8 with a manual, which comes with leather, automatic climate control, foglamps, active front head restraints, keyless entry, Bluetooth, and USB/iPod connectivity, starts at $25,750, or $3095 less than a base Mustang GT. Select the ZF auto, and the cost jumps an extra $1500. Step up to the luxury-bent Grand Touring that adds distinctive brown leather, heated seats, a 360-watt Infinity audio system, and HID headlamps, and the bottom line barely crests $28,000. Or, opt for the go-getting Track and pay just $30,250. A comparably equipped 370Z Touring with Sport Package demands over $38,000. And did we mention that the 210-horse turbo starts at under $23,000?

Obviously, Hyundai has much to be proud of with its first rear-drive sport coupe. The value is unbeatable. The quality is tip-top. The road manners are respectable. The styling, with its unique Z-shaped character line and drop-beltline rear window, is standout. Sure, there are some details -- namely, the inexact manual and the numb steering -- that need some fine-tuning. But for an initial effort, in a field that it's never played, Hyundai has delivered a solid, sexy product.

UNNATURAL ASPIRATIONS
Don't need a V-6?

If a large-displacement V-6 seems superfluous, the Genesis Coupe's 2.0-liter turbo four will seem just plain super. With 210 horsepower and 223 pound-feet channeled through a six-speed manual (a five-speed automatic is optional), the 2.0T should hit 60 in about 6.0 seconds and the quarter mile in roughly 14.6 ticks at 95 mph., yet still dispense an estimated 21/30 mpg. And given the $22,750 starting price, the 2.0T delivers bang for the buck that will make such front-drive pocket-rockets as the VW GTI and Honda Civic Si take notice. For those in search of more street cred, there's the $27,500 2.0T Track, replete with a limited slip, Brembos, and 19-inch wheels, as well as the $24,500 R-Spec, a decontented Track trim for tuners and autocrossers.

WAGGING TAILS AND SMOKING TIRES

Drift on Sunday, sell on Monday. That'll be Hyundai's motto as it enters the 2009 Formula Drift Professional Drifting Championship with multiple champion Rhys Millen. To achieve the target curb weight of 2400 pounds, Millen and his team gave the Genesis Coupe drift car an alkali bath to remove all rubber and adhesives from the chassis and then replaced every metal body panel with ones made from carbon fiber. The chassis is stitch-welded for extra strength, a necessary step given the stiffness levels of the KW three-way adjustable coil-over suspension. A stroked 4.1-liter Lambda V-6 that makes 550 horsepower and 520 pound-feet provides the rubber-melting power; and there's plenty of it to instantly fry a pair of Toyo Proxes R1R tires. Look for Millen and his Red Bull Genesis in the drift championship as well as in the Pikes Peak hillclimb and select Redline Time Attack events.



 

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Sweet write up & looks like Hyundai did it again, hitting the nail directly on the head. Although, i"m supprised the A/T turned better times & the M/T didn't seem as refined. I'm also supprised by the R-Spec bump in price from $23,750 to $24,500. This $750 price difference will not make me stutter what so ever though. Can't wait to see what the revised Genesis & GenCoupes have to offer. If this is Hyundai's 1st attempts at luxury & sport, the next generation of Genesis will probably more than just the best valued cars in their class.



 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Some Stats:

0-60: 5.5 (MT/AT)
1/4: 14.0 @ 101mph (AT); 14.3 @ 99.5 mph (MT)

2.0T Estimated Numbers:
0-60: 6.0 seconds
1/4: 14.6 @ 96 MPH

Not sure how they came up with those numbers on the Turbo but they seem reasonable. The V6 numbers are off pace to some of it's competitors in a straight line but not much..



 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Sweet write up & looks like Hyundai did it again, hitting the nail directly on the head. Although, i"m supprised the A/T turned better times & the M/T didn't seem as refined. I'm also supprised by the R-Spec bump in price from $23,750 to $24,500. This $750 price difference will not make me stutter what so ever though. Can't wait to see what the revised Genesis & GenCoupes have to offer. If this is Hyunai's 1st attempts at luxury & sport, the next generation of Genesis will probably more than just the best valued cars in their class.
I think MT may have made a mistake on the R-Spec pricing, the official pricing was at $23,500... I dont see Hyundai upping it $750 less than 2 weeks from their official announcment. Who knows though, even at $24,500 it's still a great value like you said... I can't wait to see some reviews of the turbo model though, I want to see what this turbo engine can do!



 

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Sweet write up & looks like Hyundai did it again, hitting the nail directly on the head. Although, i"m supprised the A/T turned better times & the M/T didn't seem as refined. I'm also supprised by the R-Spec bump in price from $23,750 to $24,500. This $750 price difference will not make me stutter what so ever though. Can't wait to see what the revised Genesis & GenCoupes have to offer. If this is Hyundai's 1st attempts at luxury & sport, the next generation of Genesis will probably more than just the best valued cars in their class.
I'm 99.9% sure that $750 is adding the "freight charge" to the MSRP ... not mentioned in the "official pricing", but build one on Hyundai's web site and it gets added on.

Doug
 

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I'm 99.9% sure that $750 is adding the "freight charge" to the MSRP ... not mentioned in the "official pricing", but build one on Hyundai's web site and it gets added on.

Doug
I believe you are correct sir..:bow:



 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
other magazine tests have 0-60 times for the 3.8l of 5.7 to 6.4. very disappointing for a car with 300hp.
Yeah depending on the source the 0-60 times are all over the place... one thing to keep in mind is that Hyundai was in my opinion very conservative in the programming of the ecu to protect the engine and drivetrain.. For example, hit the rev limiter, down shift and there will be a 3 second torque reduction before you get full power again..



 

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That 3 second delay better not be in the 2.0's... Otherwise I'm gonna have to crack the ecu and get rid of it. That's one of the stupidest things I've ever heard of a car manufacturer to do. And driveline lash is basically the physical movement of the engine/transmission/differential die to the use of soft engine mounts. Throw some polyurethane bushings in there, and I bet everything will feel much better, although vibration will be transmitted into the chassis more than with the stock mounts.
 

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5.5s in 0-60 makes more sense. I was beginning to doubt Hyundai's seriousness with this car but it appears that the other testers just don't know how to drive. Motortrend seems like a trustable source, so I'm happy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
That 3 second delay better not be in the 2.0's... Otherwise I'm gonna have to crack the ecu and get rid of it. That's one of the stupidest things I've ever heard of a car manufacturer to do. And driveline lash is basically the physical movement of the engine/transmission/differential die to the use of soft engine mounts. Throw some polyurethane bushings in there, and I bet everything will feel much better, although vibration will be transmitted into the chassis more than with the stock mounts.
Yeah who knows what the reason is for the torque reduction... perhaps to protect the drivetrain? protect the driver from losing control if they accidently hit the rev limiter? perhaps more info will come out..

as far as the 2.0t.. it uses a Siemens ECU... and from the reports I hear it was purposely used because it's not hard to crack... which to me means there is no encyption being used and we should see the open source community run with this ECU.... and you'll see the more developed companies also making products for this car..



 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
5.5s in 0-60 makes more sense. I was beginning to doubt Hyundai's seriousness with this car but it appears that the other testers just don't know how to drive. Motortrend seems like a trustable source, so I'm happy.
Motortrend usually has faster numbers than the other outfits.. Edmunds is usually conservative in their numbers.. and really when it comes down to it the numbers are close enough to each other to not really matter. On the street you won't see such small differences anyways...



 

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Guys, don't get hung up on horsepower only. This car is only 266 ft/lbs. of torque and is no lightweight. That is going to hurt 0-60 times. As I have mentioned several times already, torque is what matters on the street, horsepower at the track. This is just about where the figures should be on this car. I have been saying all along that it was not going to be a monster out of the box and that we all needed to keep it in perspective.
 

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Just to keep things in perspective, I got this time slip of a guy with a new Mitsu Ralliart. His best time with a 3k drop on his SST transmission (not a good idea) was a 14.1. The RA costs at least 25-30k depending on options and is AWD to boot. This is the 4 cylinder turbo. I realize I am comparing vs. the NA V6.

Car and driver
RA numbers 0-60 5.4,
1/4 14.2 @95
3500 lb. curb weight
.82 skid pad
253 hp and 237 ft.lbs.

go to this article and see how all the turbo cars stack up. The WRX puts down impressive numbers. If the Coupe can get anywhere near that kind of performance it will be a home run.

http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews...and_five_other_sport_compacts_comparison_test
 

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Guys, don't get hung up on horsepower only. This car is only 266 ft/lbs. of torque and is no lightweight. That is going to hurt 0-60 times. As I have mentioned several times already, torque is what matters on the street, horsepower at the track. This is just about where the figures should be on this car. I have been saying all along that it was not going to be a monster out of the box and that we all needed to keep it in perspective.
+1

Just to keep things in perspective, I got this time slip of a guy with a new Mitsu Ralliart. His best time with a 3k drop on his SST transmission (not a good idea) was a 14.1. The RA costs at least 25-30k depending on options and is AWD to boot. This is the 4 cylinder turbo. I realize I am comparing vs. the NA V6.

Car and driver
RA numbers 0-60 5.4,
1/4 14.2 @95
3500 lb. curb weight
.82 skid pad
253 hp and 237 ft.lbs.

go to this article and see how all the turbo cars stack up. The WRX puts down impressive numbers. If the Coupe can get anywhere near that kind of performance it will be a home run.

Cobalt SS v WRX, and 5 More Sport Compacts - Sedans/Comparison Test/Reviews/Car and Driver - Car And Driver
Thanks for the infor Dboz



 

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okay you guys need to realize something:

motortrend and car/driver are idiots

there, i said it. they're fuggin waterhead retards that wouldn't know what it takes to properly road test a car if jeremy clarkson tattooed the cheat sheet how to on their forearms.

these cars have TONS of variables. high octane or low octane or auto or manual or base or track. did they test with the traction control on or be a man with it off?

they're retards, i dont trust their numbers ever.
 
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